The impact of gold mining on indigenous women in North Canada

This is an image of the Nunavet Territory in Northern Canada. The photo by IamNotUnique is available under a Creative Commons Licnese.

A report on the impact of resource extraction on Inuit Women and Families in Qamani’tuaq, in northern Canada, has revealed that while gold mining in the locality has created some jobs, it has also created hardships for women. The women interviewed in the report state that there has been an increase in substance abuse, discrimination and cases of sexual violence. They want ‘to see more benefits for the whole community rather than for certain individuals.’

This study is also an interesting example of how project-level reporting and revenue transparency could benefit women. The mining company in question makes royalty payments directly to Inuit organisations that are to go to the benefit of the community, including on projects that meet women’s needs. Yet the community has nothing to show for it and there is no information available as to how the revenues have been spent. Project-level reporting would enable members of the community to hold their organisations to account for how the revenues are spent.

Read an article about this report or the full report itself – The impact of resource extraction on Inuit women and families in Qamani’tuaq, Nunavut Territory.

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1 Response to The impact of gold mining on indigenous women in North Canada

  1. Pingback: Women affected by mining | International Women in Mining Community

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